There is a storm coming called The Content Wars.

Not unlike Marvel Secret Wars, which changed Marvel comics forever (e.g. the true origin of Spiderman’s black suit), the Content Wars are about to change the motivation behind why creators use podcasting, video, and live streaming to tell their stories.

The first indications of this coming war have already started within the hallowed halls of movie and TV executive producer offices. After Hollywood combed the depths of remakes from the 80s and 90s, then bought up every book option from Harry Potter to Twilight, they are in search of new stories to feed the insatiable beast called demand. They have already begun using podcasting and on-line video to prototype new TV and Movie content (e.g. Homecoming, Lore, Dr. Death).

What is coming next is a tidal wave of intellectual property (IP) experimentation that will include both known A/B/C level actors (who need to work) and new actors who can make a name for themselves with minimal studio financial risk (e.g. the Audio Drama The Oyster from The Paragon Collective stars like Logan Browning (The Perfection), Mamoudou Athie (Jurassic World), Carla Gugino (Haunting of Hill House), Keith David (Greenleaf), Giancarlo Esposito (Breaking Bad), to name a few). Fortunately, for content creators, executive production studios will need more stories to produce than ever before to feed this war. This is how a whole new cadre of podcasters, video storytellers, and even live streamer talent will have the opportunity to become their own showrunners, writers, and producers for REAL production companies that pay big money.

Additionally, this will create a new door for audio drama and audio fiction podcast producers to enter the world of entertainment media by either sharing their original IP with the world or by selling the rights to their unique IP for millions.

Unfortunately, this coming Content War will have its casualties when the content gold rush will make studios fight over content. The introduction of new podcast platforms (e.g. Amazon, Spotify) in combination with a big push into streaming services (e.g. Netflix, Hulu, Disney+, Discovery+, HBO Max) has already shown how desperate studios are to meet this demand. This means as the Content Wars heat up into a buying frenzy many of these new IPs and newfound talent will fall short. Companies will buy up the rights to individual podcasts, video series, streaming show ideas, online networks, and endless amounts of audio content — to include anything not nailed down or copyrighted — to make sure they get it first. Many podcasts, video creators, and live streamers are going to become very wealthy during this Content War bubble. But in the end, will lose their shows to the juggernaut that will sweep through our industry in search of the next best thing.

When this Content War ends, who will be left standing? Will it have all been worth it?

I believe those that have invested heavily into their show have a very good chance of seeing the Content Wars elevate their idea into a major IP that is remembered for decades. Yet, the only way any of us benefit from this is to have something of value ready to share with the world.

When your new story idea becomes more valuable than ever before, will you be ready? Is your show ready for the coming Content Wars?

It better be! Because there is a storm coming…

About the Author

Kyle M. Bondo is dedicated to simplifying the complicated world of digital creation. As the Chief Creative at Gagglepod, Kyle has been creating digital media for over 5 years, designed and produced several podcasts, and hopes to make a small dent in your universe by evangelizing the principles behind good digital design.